1. 15:14 11th Apr 2014

    Notes: 1151

    Reblogged from breakingnews

    breakingnews:

    Bloomberg News: The U.S. National Security Agency knew for at least two years about a flaw in the way that many websites send sensitive information and regularly used it to gather critical intelligence, two people familiar with the matter said.

    More updates on the Heartbleed bug.

     
  2. 06:34 10th Apr 2014

    Notes: 211

    Reblogged from azspot

    Mass incarceration has long been present in extreme dictatorships. But today it is emerging as inextricably linked to advanced capitalism…Most of the people who are being incarcerated are also the people who do not have work and from whom work will not be found in our current epoch…today’s prisoners in the United States and United Kingdom are increasingly today’s version of the surplus laboring population common in the brutal beginnings of modern capitalism…many transnational corporations have set up satellite factories inside prisons…Available evidence suggests that the majority of corporations profiting [in some form] from prison labor [include] Chevron, Bank of America, AT&T, Starbucks and Walmart…the profits of private prisons are represented are represented as a positive addition to a country’s GDP even as they are a government cost; in contrast, government run prisons are only represented as government debt.
    — Saskia Sassen (via azspot)
     
  3. 06:34

    Notes: 211

    Reblogged from azspot

    Mass incarceration has long been present in extreme dictatorships. But today it is emerging as inextricably linked to advanced capitalism…Most of the people who are being incarcerated are also the people who do not have work and from whom work will not be found in our current epoch…today’s prisoners in the United States and United Kingdom are increasingly today’s version of the surplus laboring population common in the brutal beginnings of modern capitalism…many transnational corporations have set up satellite factories inside prisons…Available evidence suggests that the majority of corporations profiting [in some form] from prison labor [include] Chevron, Bank of America, AT&T, Starbucks and Walmart…the profits of private prisons are represented are represented as a positive addition to a country’s GDP even as they are a government cost; in contrast, government run prisons are only represented as government debt.
    — Saskia Sassen (via azspot)
     
  4. 15:53 9th Apr 2014

    Notes: 16393

    Reblogged from cognitivedissonance

    sandandglass:

    Jon Stewart and Matt Taibbi discuss the different treatment afforded to ‘street’ and white-collar criminals. 

     
  5. 15:47

    Notes: 18

    Reblogged from azspot

    I’m an evangelical pastor trying to walk the same Romans Road in my evangelical congregation, the Vineyard Church of Ann Arbor. We have gay couples in our church, some who have adopted children. Some are female couples. When I read the only text in the entire Bible that says anything about lesbian sex (and St. Augustine thought it referred to something other than lesbian sex) and had to decide whether to apply the traditional exclusionary practices (if you are a gay couple you can’t be a member, or you can’t lead, or if you want Jesus to help you stay together to parent your children, don’t ask for our prayers) I said to myself, “Why not treat this as a disputable matter, and stop excluding people over it?” And that is what I have done.
    — 

    Ken Wilson (via azspot)

    I guess this is what sticks in my craw. So much of the “scripture” that people derive their positions from is sketchy at best.

     
  6. 15:32

    Notes: 3

    image: Download

    “You see the main argument Republicans use is that it’s some lazy person who needs Medicaid expansion. That those of us living without healthcare or dental care are lazy. But my friend, a single beautiful mother, worked three jobs,” Woolrich wrote. “I am burying my best friend because of the policies of the Republican Party. I am burying my best friend because had Medicaid expanded, her needs would have been met.” (via This 32-Year-Old Florida Woman Is Dead Because Her State Refused To Expand Medicaid | ThinkProgress)

    “You see the main argument Republicans use is that it’s some lazy person who needs Medicaid expansion. That those of us living without healthcare or dental care are lazy. But my friend, a single beautiful mother, worked three jobs,” Woolrich wrote. “I am burying my best friend because of the policies of the Republican Party. I am burying my best friend because had Medicaid expanded, her needs would have been met.” (via This 32-Year-Old Florida Woman Is Dead Because Her State Refused To Expand Medicaid | ThinkProgress)

     
  7. 13:59

    Notes: 88

    Reblogged from theatlantic

    image: Download

    theatlantic:

Black Culture and Progressivism

Some pieces of news precipitate a kind of journalistic pile-on. This can be unfortunate, a reason to rue the deluge of opinion (see: drawn-out analysis of James Franco’s antics, again and again). Or, because there are many smart and shrewd voices out there, the same density of opinion can enrich our understanding of complicated issues (see: drawn-out analysis of Edward Snowden). The pile-on—of either variety—is good for convening dissonant points of view. But the hubbub tends to obscure the subtler strands of opinion: The people who mostly agree with one another are flattened into the same perspective, and the interesting gradations that separate, say, one kind of liberal or conservative from another are lost.
There is special pleasure, then, in reading writers narrower conversation. Bill Keller and Glenn Greenwald sparred over the future of news in the New York Times last year, with provocative results. Roundtables like Slate’s Supreme Court Breakfast Table illuminate the less visible corners of controversy by forcing like-minded commentators to make agreement interesting and disagreement intelligent.
Over the past two weeks, Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jonathan Chait of New York have engaged in a comparatively spontaneous back and forth that has accomplished this to great effect, shedding light on the places were progressives thoughtfully but profoundly disagree. The conversation began with no particular rules in place or end in sight—and their debate has proceeded with the intensity and unpredictability that such an approach entails.
Read more. [Image: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters]

    theatlantic:

    Black Culture and Progressivism

    Some pieces of news precipitate a kind of journalistic pile-on. This can be unfortunate, a reason to rue the deluge of opinion (see: drawn-out analysis of James Franco’s antics, again and again). Or, because there are many smart and shrewd voices out there, the same density of opinion can enrich our understanding of complicated issues (see: drawn-out analysis of Edward Snowden). The pile-on—of either variety—is good for convening dissonant points of view. But the hubbub tends to obscure the subtler strands of opinion: The people who mostly agree with one another are flattened into the same perspective, and the interesting gradations that separate, say, one kind of liberal or conservative from another are lost.

    There is special pleasure, then, in reading writers narrower conversation. Bill Keller and Glenn Greenwald sparred over the future of news in the New York Times last year, with provocative results. Roundtables like Slate’s Supreme Court Breakfast Table illuminate the less visible corners of controversy by forcing like-minded commentators to make agreement interesting and disagreement intelligent.

    Over the past two weeks, Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jonathan Chait of New York have engaged in a comparatively spontaneous back and forth that has accomplished this to great effect, shedding light on the places were progressives thoughtfully but profoundly disagree. The conversation began with no particular rules in place or end in sight—and their debate has proceeded with the intensity and unpredictability that such an approach entails.

    Read more. [Image: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters]

     
  8. Black Pathology and the Closing of the Progressive Mind

     
  9. 20:00 5th Apr 2014

    Notes: 2322

    Reblogged from cognitivedissonance

    image: Download

    fallontonight:

- Jimmy Fallon’s Monologue; April 4, 2014
[ Part 1 / Part 2 ]

    fallontonight:

    - Jimmy Fallon’s Monologue; April 4, 2014

    [ Part 1 / Part 2 ]

     
  10. 10:17

    Notes: 20

    Reblogged from azspot

    Yeah, it’s personal for me. The same principle that made Brendan Eich unemployable at Mozilla, despite his incredible achievements in his field, and his public pledge to treat gay people fairly, makes me and many of my friends and colleagues unemployable. I do not want to live in a world in which gay people get fired for their sexuality, when their sexuality has nothing to do with their ability to do their job. But the kind of people who ousted Brendan Eich want to live in a world in which expressing the “wrong” opinion about same-sex marriage makes one unemployable, even if that opinion has nothing to do with their ability to execute their professional responsibilities. This is not going to end well.
     
  11. 10:13

    Notes: 10

    Reblogged from gohomekiki

    timekiller-s:

    Good reading at Mother Jones and there is a little of this in the Oklahoma City market.

     
  12. 07:13

    Notes: 3112

    Reblogged from warmskin

    perks-of-being-a-gall-bladder:

    jazzypom:

    Happy Birthday, Ms Angelo. 

    So pick it up.

    (Source: peakintheshadow)

     
  13. 07:06

    Notes: 567

    Reblogged from mostlysignssomeportents

    aljazeeraamerica:

    Continue reading

     
  14. 21:44 2nd Apr 2014

    Notes: 80

    Reblogged from odinsblog

    Look, here’s the truth.  They’re not necessarily cold-hearted, they just sincerely believe that if we give more tax breaks to a fortunate few and we invest less in the middle class, and we reduce or eliminate the safety net for the poor and the sick, and we cut food stamps, and we cut Medicaid, and we let banks and polluters and credit card companies and insurers do only what’s best for their bottom line without the responsibility to the rest of us, then somehow the economy will boom, and jobs and prosperity will trickle down to everybody.

    And when I say it that way, I know it sounds like I’m exaggerating — except I’m not.  This is their theory.  They’re pretty unabashed about it.  And it’s not a new theory.  They’ve held it for decades, through good times and bad.  They were making the same argument against FDR when he was setting up Social Security.
    — Barack Obama 4.2.2014 (via odinsblog)
     
  15. 17:53

    Notes: 1

    James Baldwin’s The Devil Finds Work, a book-length essay on race and America and cinema, movingly demonstrates that analysis of art can be art itself. (via The Most Powerful Piece of Film Criticism Ever Written - Noah Berlatsky - The Atlantic)

    James Baldwin’s The Devil Finds Work, a book-length essay on race and America and cinema, movingly demonstrates that analysis of art can be art itself. (via The Most Powerful Piece of Film Criticism Ever Written - Noah Berlatsky - The Atlantic)